This Snowy Plover is sooooo Adorable!

This Snowy Plover is sooooo Adorable!

You can find them along the Pacific Coast as well as the Gulf Coast. They look a lot like the Piping Plover, but unlike the Piping Plover, the Snowy’s black chest band is always incomplete.

Often overlooked when you’re walking along the beach, these little ones are only around 6 inches!

Unfortunately, because they are so hard to spot, their population has declined. Humans will hang out on the beaches and not even notice that they are keeping the Snowy Plover from its nest. On many beaches now they have started to rope off areas just for the Plovers to build their nests in.

Unfortunately, the Plovers don’t always get the memo… so keep a look out for them whenever you are walking the beaches during nesting season.

The young leave the nest only a few hours after hatching, they are able to feed themselves and will be able to fly around 30 days later.

Don’t forget to check out my book on Amazon called Snowy at the Beach, about the adventures of a cute Snowy Plover.

Barred Owl Nap Time…

Barred Owl Nap Time…

A few days ago I saw this cutie sitting on a low branch in my backyard. This is the Barred Owl. Often heard at night with it’s loud rich baritone hoo, hoo, hoo-hoo call, other times they can be heard making barking and screaming calls…

This one was just trying to take a nap. No other bird was around, no one was bothering it (except this crazy human taking photos)…

Occasionally it would peek at me, just to make sure I was still social distancing.

They are permanent residents throughout Canada and down through the eastern half of the US.

They will eat mostly small mammals. Usually eating mice, but also eats other small rodents, squirrels and rabbits.

On a couple of occasions the owl has come zooming into the backyard so fast and so close to me that I thought it was going to crash into me! It came around the corner of the house and didn’t see me standing in the backyard, luckily for both of us it is really good at flying!!!

Cute Canada Geese Goslings

Cute Canada Geese Goslings

These cuties can be seen all over the place now, tis the season…

They are born with their eyes open and will leave the nest within 24 hours.

You can find them throughout all of the US and Canada. In the past most would migrate in the winter, but now many of the ones that live in urban areas will remain permanent residents.

Remember to stay healthy and stay safe!

I Found This Peregrine Falcon on the Cliffs in Rancho Palos Verdes, California

I Found This Peregrine Falcon on the Cliffs in Rancho Palos Verdes, California

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Peregrine Falcon

If you’re looking for this falcon, just take a drive down to Rancho Palos Verdes in California. Go to the Point Vicente Interpreative Center and take a look down over the cliffs and you should see a pair of Peregrine Falcons flying around. The center is a great place for birding. Each time I go I see the Falcon as well as a few species of seabirds since I am right on the ocean. Here you will also see volunteers looking each day for whales, they’ll do a daily count of the whales that pass by. 

The Peregrine Falcon is a large and powerful bird that can reach speeds of well over 100 mph when its diving for it’s prey. They are one of the world’s fastest birds. It will often hunt by flying very high then diving down to strike their prey out of the air! Other birds especially pigeons are the favored prey for the city falcons, while ducks and shorebirds are what the coastal falcons favor.

This Falcon may mate for life. Usually they will nest on cliffs, but due to limited availability of nesting sites and prey they’ll often relocate into cities. Building ledges make for great nesting sites and there are plenty of pigeons around… The Peregrine Falcon can be found on all six continents, but not often seen. Due to the use of pesticides during the 1940s-1970s there was widespread failure to reproduce for this falcon. They all but disappeared from their former breeding range. Luckily,  due to conservationists helping to ban the use of bad pesticides in North America, the Peregrine Falcon has been reintroduced into many areas and their population has become stable or possibly increasing! This bird is considered one of the noblest and most spectacular of all the birds of prey!

Louisiana Waterthrush

Louisiana Waterthrush

This is the Louisiana Waterthrush. They are similar to a thrush because they can be found walking along the water’s edge foraging for food, but they are actually a warbler.

Often times you’ll see them walking with their backend bobbing up and down. They will turn over leaves on the ground near or in the water looking for insects or crustaceans.

I saw this one along a river, I think I spooked it, so up it flew to a branch above my head. Later it went back down along the edge of the water and started foraging for food. Both the male and females look identical, so I don’t know which this one was…

Remember to stay healthy and stay safe!

Meet the Tanagers

Meet the Tanagers

Lately I’ve been hearing the Summer Tanager singing and singing all day long. They say the song sounds like that of a lazy robin…

I do know that they can be difficult to spot because they like to hang amongst the leaves in the treetops.

I was lucky with this one, he landed on a wire above my head.

The males are a bright rosy red all over their body, while the females are yellow. Below is a young male, he is a mix of yellow and red, but will eventually be all red.

The Summer Tanager and then Scarlet Tanager both will spend their winters in the tropics.

The male Scarlet Tanager is a deep red bird with black on its wings and tail. The female is a yellow-green.

I don’t see as many of the Scarlet as I do the Summer since there are far less of them in my area. The Scarlet also seems to sing less and stay higher up in the trees than the Summer.

Both of these Tanagers will eat mostly insects, including bees.

Remember to stay healthy and stay safe!

A Few More Birds…

A Few More Birds…

Here are some of the birds that I’ve been seeing lately. Springtime is great, because the birds are singing so much, but sooooo many leaves make it hard to get good photos…

Here’s the Blue Grosbeak. They will spend the winter in the tropics. Insects and seeds make up their diet, which they get mostly while walking along the ground.

The Eastern Towhee will breed up into New England and down into all of the East Coast. Most of the southern birds don’t migrate at all and you can spot them all year long, while the ones in the North will migrate south for the winter.

This Ovenbird has a very loud song that sounds like it’s singing “teacher, teacher”. Usually they are hard to spot, but you know that they are there because you hear them! They forage for insects as they walk along the leaf littered ground.

Remember to stay healthy and stay safe!

Meet the Wood Duck

Meet the Wood Duck

The Male is very colorful and well actually, pretty! Though the female isn’t quite as colorful, she is still beautiful…

They will make a loud wooo-eeek call when startled into flight…

This is a photo of the male Wood Duck, see his dark green head and bright red eye!

Here is the female, her head is gray and she has a white eye-patch as well as a beautiful patch of blue on her wings.

They breed mostly in the east, but also can be permanent residents on the west coast. They will pair off in the winter, then the males will follow the females to the nesting range. Some years a male might end up migrating close by, while the next year he may go farther up north (they get a new mate each year)…

They nest in tree cavities near water which can be up to 65 feet above the ground! Often females will lay their eggs in others’ nests, leaving that female to incubate the eggs.

Young ducklings jump to the ground the day after they hatch!!!

Mom will take care of them for about 6 weeks.

Remember to stay healthy and stay safe!

New Bird Book

New Bird Book

I wanted to let you all know that I just finished another book!

This one is about a Bohemian Waxwing that I saw in an apple orchard a few years ago. It was a lifer for me and the only time that I have ever seen the Bohemian Waxwings.

If you get a chance, check it out on Amazon. I created it as an ebook and a paperback. I give out a lot of the paperbacks to the kids I know, I find that it helps to get them interested in birds and nature.

Remember to stay healthy and stay safe!